....................................................................................................................................................................................................

Thursday, November 25, 2010

Why we write

IT is often said that an idea clearly understood can be clearly written. Disorientation in our writing, lack of clarity is then, following this old adage, a sign of intellectual confusion or, at best, sloppiness.

We have all read prose and thought to ourselves: “He or she has no idea what (he or she) is talking about!” Usually the prose is unclear, cluttered and confusing.
I will admit that I have often been guilty of the crime. When I read my work I sometimes find myself saying, “You really are not clear there” or “What you have written makes no sense at all”. Such is the cost of not thinking and writing clearly.
So why write? What’s the point? Why such effort when the rewards apparently are so meagre?

George Orwell, whose writings many consider as the exemplar of clear prose and strong commitment, provides one point of view. According to Orwell, in his essay Why I Write (1946), there are usually four reasons why we write.
The first is “sheer egoism”. Orwell argues that the desire to “seem clever, to be talked about, to be remembered after death” is a primary motive. Vanity, according to Orwell, drives us to write.
The second reason is aesthetic enthusiasm. Orwell wrote: “Perception of beauty in the external world, or, on the other hand, in words and their right arrangement” are examples of an aesthetic appreciation that motivates many to write.



Read more: Why we write http://www.nst.com.my/nst/articles/Whywewrite/Article#ixzz16JBq2Dtt

No comments:

Post a Comment